WordPress, holy grail CMS, but imperfect.

WordPress, holy grail CMS, but imperfect.

When I first started my journey down the web development road the tools of the day (circa. 2001) were simple and crude – a plain text editor, a browser, and some image editing software, and general knowledge of HTML is all one basically needed. Static, minimally dynamic sites were the order of the day. As frameworks and Content Management Systems (CMS) became more robust attention began to refocus on efforts to make them more accessible, robust, secure, and dynamic. WordPress is no exception.

I have been using WordPress as a defacto-standard CMS for some years now. The reason I keep using the framework? Plugins, plugins, plugins. WordPress, in of itself, is a lightweight, CMS package using a typical LAMP Stack; Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP, and a template processor (WordPress). What makes it so great to use is its simple approach and “word processor” like interface for adding dynamic content in a backend interface. Something must be right, over 60,000,000 websites run on WordPress as of this article.

One small negative related to WordPress is that because it is an open source system most developers enhance it’s functionality via plugins. Plugins are great, and add tons of additional functionality and interaction outside of the WordPress installation, with a caveat.

With that said, software on any platform is imperfect. One small negative related to WordPress is that because it is an open source system most developers enhance it’s functionality via plugins. Plugins are great, and add tons of additional functionality and interaction outside of the WordPress installation, with a caveat. Some include image galleries, web apps, social media, video, audio etc. The flip-side of this coin is not all plugins are created equal.

With thousands of plugins easily found online, it becomes clear that not all plugins are qualitatively similar. Some have not been debugged correctly, may interfere with other plugins and render certain aspects of the CMS non-functional. With that said, a few pointers from our friends over at Site Point have a great guide to minimize down time, plugin incompatibility, and general CMS common sense. Check it out Here